Best Violin

Top 10 Best Violin in India | 12th Aug 2020

Reviews, Comparison and Buying Guide

Violin

What is Violin?

The violin, sometimes known as a fiddle, is a wooden string instrument in the violin family. Most violins have a hollow wooden body. It is the smallest and highest-pitched instrument (soprano) in the family in regular use. The violin typically has four strings, usually tuned in perfect fifths with notes G3, D4, A4, E5, and is most commonly played by drawing a bow across its strings.

Violins are important instruments in a wide variety of musical genres. They are most prominent in the Western classical tradition, both in ensembles (from chamber music to orchestras) and as solo instruments. Violins are also important in many varieties of folk music, including country music, bluegrass music and in jazz. Electric violins with solid bodies and piezoelectric pickups are used in some forms of rock music and jazz fusion, with the pickups plugged into instrument amplifiers and speakers to produce sound. The violin has come to be incorporated in many non-Western music cultures, including Indian music and Iranian music. The name fiddle is often used regardless of the type of music played on it.

Why Violin

You may find yourself getting tired after first starting the violin. This is completely normal. As your arm muscles and upper body become stronger, they become stronger and this fatigue will lessen. As a result; stronger arms, more stamina, and burned calories.

Another amazing benefits of playing violin is that it requires you to have impeccable posture. This means you’ll need to have your back straight, shoulders back, and limbs relaxed.

When you’re stressed, playing the violin is a very healthy way to let off some anger. The sound of the music can even be calming, and playing a song you know well can provide relaxation.

Best Violin | Buying Guide : Things to consider while buying a Violin

Buying a violin is a serious decision that a beginner or advanced violinist can make because it is an expensive investment. And to an untrained eye, violins may look alike but in reality, there are various types of violin in terms of size, quality, make, and sizes.

As someone who is at the early stage of violin playing, it will be beneficial to read about student violin reviews.

Here, we have created a guide to help you, whether you are a beginner violinist or an intermediate one, taking into consideration the affordability and quality of violins.

Basics of Violin Construction

In some respects most every violin is the same—four strings stretched over a small body, a tailpiece and chinrest at one end, and a neck and pegbox at the other. Most violins don’t offer the design variations that many modern instruments have, but any violin player will tell you that all violins are not created equal.

The key factors that determine each violin’s tone and playability are the quality of its tonewoods and the skill with which it is constructed.

Types of Tonewood

The type and quality of the wood used to build a violin is the most important factor in the instrument’s particular sound. While most violins use the same types of tonewood—spruce tops, and maple necks, backs and sides—the quality of the wood varies, which is reflected in the price differences between instruments.

The top of the violin body is its soundboard—the wood that amplifies the sound produced by the resonating strings. Spruce has been a favorite tonewood for violin soundboards for centuries because it is naturally both stiff and dense. It’s strength means it can be delicately carved but still maintain its shape, while its density creates better resonance than more porous woods.

The quality of the spruce is a significant part of what determines the price of the instrument. There are several species of spruce that are used for violin tops, and some players prefer one over the others. Trees that grow in colder climates produce denser, more resonant, and thus more desirable spruce wood. The longer a block of spruce is allowed to age, the drier and stronger it becomes. So a piece of spruce grown at high altitude and seasoned for decades before carving will produce a superior top wood.

A further consideration is the beauty of the grain. The finest spruce will have beautiful flame-like figuring. Finely crafted violins typically employ beautifully book-matched pieces of spruce for the top that are meticulously joined to create an attractive pattern.

Similarly, not all maple is created equal. The back, sides, and necks of premium-quality violins are crafted from tightly grained wood that has been aged then carved with great precision.

Other woods on a violin will help determine it’s durability, sound, and value. The fingerboard, for example, is preferably made of ebony, but economy violins may use less expensive wood. Some instruments may also have alloy tailpieces and/or plastic chin rests and lesser-quality bridges.

The quality of the violin’s finish also usually reflects its price. Finely crafted violins are finished with exceedingly thin coats of varnish and carefully polished between coats. Varnishes contain pigments that give the instrument a wonderful patina while also bringing out the beauty of the wood’s underlying grain patterns.

Types of Violin

In addition to Student, Intermediate, and Professional, you may see individual violins described as Master or Advanced. There are no clear, universally accepted standards for any of these categories. Manufacturers and luthiers all have their own standards, but the classifications themselves can be general guidelines to help narrow down your search.

Student Violins

In general, a student violin will be made from lower-quality woods and involve much less hand work in the carving, assembly and finishing. They typically have plastic parts such as tuning pegs and chinrests. These instruments are well suited for someone who is interested in learning, but who is not yet sure if they will play for very long.

Intermediate Violins

Filling the gap between student and professional instruments are violins classified as intermediate. Some stores and brands omit this category, only drawing a distinction between student and professional violins. It is a helpful category, however, for musicians who know they need something better than a beginner instrument, but aren’t ready to invest thousands of dollars in a professional violin. Students who are advancing in their skills are typical intermediate violin buyers.

Professional Violins

Professional or master violins, on the other hand, will be constructed from cold-grown and slow-dried wood, hand built and assembled by a master luthier, and finished with high-quality components such as an ebony fingerboard and wooden tailpiece. The excellent materials and refined artistic skill that go into these instruments drive up their value, and make them appropriate instruments for professional and aspiring, advanced musicians.

Remember that any category assignment given to an instrument is a generalization. They are useful to get you started in the process of shopping for a violin, but it’s also possible to find a gem that has an underrated categorization. It’s worth exploring all of your options.

Violin Sizes

Violins come in nine sizes. Adults—generally from age 11 and older—will use a standard, full-sized violin. For children, there are also 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/10, 1/16 and 1/32 violins. The full-sized violin is also referred to as a 4/4 size.

There are two ways to measure a young player for a violin. With the student’s left arm fully extended away from his or her body, measure from the base of the neck to either the wrist or the center of the palm. If your child has a violin instructor, you may want to ask which method the instructor prefers. The neck-to-wrist measurement will indicate the most comfortable size for the student. The neck-to-palm measurement will determine the largest instrument your child should play.

If you are unsure which measurement strategy to use, or your child’s measurement falls between two sizes, consider how fast he or she will grow into an instrument that is slightly too large, as opposed to how fast he or she will outgrow one that is just a little too small.

Acoustic vs. Electric Violins

The traditional acoustic violin stretches four strings from tuning pegs to a tailpiece, over a bridge made of maple that transfers sound vibrations to the soundboard.

While there are electric pickups that can be fitted to an acoustic violin, a true electric violin has built-in pickups to amplify its sound. To avoid feedback caused by resonance in the violin’s hollow body, electric violins usually have solid bodies, and often have minimalistic designs to reduce weight.

An acoustic violin produces warm, rounded tone thanks to the natural resonance of its tonewoods. The electronic signal generated by an electric violin can be tweaked and enhanced, but it will generally produce a brighter, more raw sound than its acoustic counterparts. Classical and folk musicians tend to prefer acoustic instruments, while rock and jazz musicians lean more toward electric violins. Thanks to their plug-and-play capability, electric violins are a good choice for musicians who play with amplified bands.

If you’re shopping for a new player, consider the style of music they prefer or will play the most. If your teenager, for example, is learning classical violin, but really likes the look of an electric violin, they will likely be more motivated to actually play an electric one (and he will be able to practice very quietly). Acoustic and electric violins have similar playing dynamics, so transitioning from one to the other is not too difficult.

Violin Care and Maintenance

The best violin is the one that is best maintained. You’ll want to make sure your violin and any accessories are properly stored in a case when not being used, that they are kept in mild temperatures and moderate humidity, and that they are kept clean. If you are looking for a first violin, here are a few accessories to consider in order to properly preserve your instrument:

  • Case: Don’t assume the violin you choose comes with a case. If you order an “outfit,” you will get a bow, rosin, and a case, but if you’re just buying a violin, you may need to buy a separate case as well.
  • Humidifier: An acoustic violin should be kept at 45-50% relative humidity to avoid damage to the tonewoods. If you live in a dry area, you will especially want to look into an instrument humidifier.
  • Cleaning Supplies: A violin needs to be kept free of dirt and dust. You can browse Musician’s Friend’s complete selection of care and cleaning supplies for violins here.
  • Strings: Depending on how much you play, we recommend changing your strings every six to 12 months.

Top 10 Best Violin – [Updated and Highly Recommended]

Comparison Chart to make your purchase easy

Sr. No.
Bestseller
1
Hot
2
3
4
Most Value
5
Photo
Kadence, Vivaldi 4/4 Violin With Bow, Rosin, Hard Case SM10
Arctic Onyx Violin Kit - Violin 4/4 with case, bow & Rosin
PAL MUSIC HOUSE 4/4 Violin With Case bow & Rosin(imported)
SG Musical Best Sound 4/4 violin, Hard CarryBox, Bow and Rosin (Natural)
Blue Panther Imported Violin With Case, Bow and Rosin
Price
₹ 7,999
Price not available
₹ 3,700
₹ 4,499
₹ 3,200
Weight (g)
1.5
2.34
1.2
3
0.5
Dimension (cm)
103 x 96 x 12
72 x 28 x 15
77 x 25 x 12
30 x 18.01 x 18.01
80 x 26 x 12
Rating
-
-
-
Reviews
-
-
-
6 Reviews
40 Reviews
Prime
-
-
-
Bestseller
Sr. No.
1
Photo
Kadence, Vivaldi 4/4 Violin With Bow, Rosin, Hard Case SM10
Price
₹ 7,999
Weight (g)
1.5
Dimension (cm)
103 x 96 x 12
Details
Rating
-
Reviews
-
Check the Deal
Prime
Hot
Sr. No.
2
Photo
Arctic Onyx Violin Kit - Violin 4/4 with case, bow & Rosin
Price
Price not available
Weight (g)
2.34
Dimension (cm)
72 x 28 x 15
Details
Rating
-
Reviews
-
Check the Deal
Prime
-
Sr. No.
3
Photo
PAL MUSIC HOUSE 4/4 Violin With Case bow & Rosin(imported)
Price
₹ 3,700
Weight (g)
1.2
Dimension (cm)
77 x 25 x 12
Details
Rating
-
Reviews
-
Check the Deal
Prime
Sr. No.
4
Photo
SG Musical Best Sound 4/4 violin, Hard CarryBox, Bow and Rosin (Natural)
Price
₹ 4,499
Weight (g)
3
Dimension (cm)
30 x 18.01 x 18.01
Details
Rating
Reviews
6 Reviews
Check the Deal
Prime
-
Most Value
Sr. No.
5
Photo
Blue Panther Imported Violin With Case, Bow and Rosin
Price
₹ 3,200
Weight (g)
0.5
Dimension (cm)
80 x 26 x 12
Details
Rating
Reviews
40 Reviews
Check the Deal
Prime
-
Sr. No.
Popular
6
Highly Rated
7
8
9
5
Photo
Havana Violin full Size MV1412F with Case & Free Havana Shoulder Rest
Stentor 1500 4/4 Violin
Blueberry V-10 (Imported) Acoustic Violin (4/4, Maroon)
Infinity Colour Violin 4/4, Blue
Sharma Musical Store Maple Wood Violin with Case
Price
₹ 7,280
₹ 40,639
₹ 3,800
₹ 10,500
₹ 5,650
Weight (g)
1.25
0.52
0.8
0.78
0.6
Dimension (cm)
49 x 36 x 14
15.88 x 80.01 x 27.94
70 x 26.01 x 13.99
45 x 15 x 6
80 x 26 x 12
Rating
-
-
Reviews
3 Reviews
368 Reviews
9 Reviews
-
-
Prime
-
-
-
Popular
Sr. No.
6
Photo
Havana Violin full Size MV1412F with Case & Free Havana Shoulder Rest
Price
₹ 7,280
Weight (g)
1.25
Dimension (cm)
49 x 36 x 14
Details
Rating
Reviews
3 Reviews
Check the Deal
Prime
-
Highly Rated
Sr. No.
7
Photo
Stentor 1500 4/4 Violin
Price
₹ 40,639
Weight (g)
0.52
Dimension (cm)
15.88 x 80.01 x 27.94
Details
Rating
Reviews
368 Reviews
Check the Deal
Prime
-
Sr. No.
8
Photo
Blueberry V-10 (Imported) Acoustic Violin (4/4, Maroon)
Price
₹ 3,800
Weight (g)
0.8
Dimension (cm)
70 x 26.01 x 13.99
Details
Rating
Reviews
9 Reviews
Check the Deal
Prime
Sr. No.
9
Photo
Infinity Colour Violin 4/4, Blue
Price
₹ 10,500
Weight (g)
0.78
Dimension (cm)
45 x 15 x 6
Details
Rating
-
Reviews
-
Check the Deal
Prime
-
Sr. No.
5
Photo
Sharma Musical Store Maple Wood Violin with Case
Price
₹ 5,650
Weight (g)
0.6
Dimension (cm)
80 x 26 x 12
Details
Rating
-
Reviews
-
Check the Deal
Prime

1.

Kadence, Vivaldi 4/4 Violin With Bow, Rosin, Hard Case SM10
 
  • violin
  • violin
  • kadence violin
  • kadence violin


The Vivaldi series Violin by Kadence violin. It includes rosin, lightweight hard case, horsehair/wood bow This violin produces a rich high quality sound. The combo includes a Kadence : IMP::Setup of product is required before playing. Please refer to setup steps on Googe or YouTube for setup procedure.

Features / Reviews

Rich high quality sound

Includes rosin, lightweight hard case, horsehair/wood bow

2.

Arctic Onyx Violin Kit - Violin 4/4 with case, bow & Rosin
 
  • Pine wood top, Maple sides & back, Glossy black finish
  • Ebony fingerboard for rythmic smooth playing
  • Superior bow construction for reduced hand fatigue, Rosin included
  • Hard foam Thermo-formed-case with internal accessory pockets
  • Light weight all-in-one Violin kit with Violin, Bow, Case and Rosin
  • Country of Origin: China


Arctic Violins are prudently crafted with the best of orchestral components and flawless wood to bring together an elegant combination of body wood, design and art. Whether it is the Indian Classical, Hindustani Carnatic, Western classical or Oriental notes, Arctic Violins let the players of all genres, age-groups and levels accomplish their practice and performance goals. In addition to the perfect tonality of the Violin, the whole kit is equipped with all major accessories – Bow, Rosin and a hard case to let the users get an all-in-one pack for playing their beloved stringed instrument.

Features / Reviews

Strong and Appealing Construction

Ebony Wood Finger Board

Comes with an oblong case with hard foam thermo-formed compartments and internal accessory pockets along with a high-quality Rosin

3.

PAL MUSIC HOUSE 4/4 Violin With Case bow & Rosin(imported)
 
  • Violin Pack with hard case bow and rosin
  • Superior bow construction for reduced hand fatigue
  • Spruce top for great tones and sound


Spruce Wood Top Makes For Exceptional Tone And Superb Sound. It Comes In A Hard Protective Case For Easy Carry And Includes The Bow And Rosin In The Case.

Features / Reviews

Superior bow construction for reduced hand fatigue

Spruce top for great tones and sound

Violin Pack with hard case bow and rosin

4.

SG Musical Best Sound 4/4 violin, Hard CarryBox, Bow and Rosin (Natural)
 
SG Musical Best Sound 4/4 violin, Hard CarryBox, Bow and Rosin (Natural)
6 Reviews
  • Our production on natural a1 grade ebony
  • Boxwood for results and satisfaction
  • Rosewood material


SG Musical sound 4/4 violin, Hard CarryBox, Bow and Rosin Natural colour

Features / Reviews

Ideal for beginners and experts

Value for money

Produces soothing sound

5.

Blue Panther Imported Violin With Case, Bow and Rosin
 
Blue Panther Imported Violin With Case, Bow and Rosin
40 Reviews
  • Ebony Fingerboard
  • Fine Adjuster tailpiece
  • Dimension: 26 x 12 x 80 cm
  • Made of hardwood
  • Rosin bow included in Lightweight Hard Case


Violin will keep you going for that symphony over and over again. * Its make of Spruce wood top makes for exceptional tone and superb sound. * It comes in a hard protective case for easy carry and includes the bow and rosin in the case. * A violin needs 5-6 steps of setup before it can be played and sound produced by it. * It includes adding rosin to your bow, placement of the bridge, tuning the strings and fine tuning the strings gain near the bridge. * A violin tuning pegs are very manual and relys on friction, not tuning it properly on the headstock may result in friction burns to the body if being done on an amateur level this may result in loose strings. * The product is sent detuned to negate damage to strings and the bridge.

Features / Reviews

Ebony Fingerboard

Fine Adjuster tailpiece

Rosin bow included in Lightweight Hard Case

6.

Havana Violin full Size MV1412F with Case & Free Havana Shoulder Rest
 
Havana Violin full Size MV1412F with Case & Free Havana Shoulder Rest
3 Reviews
  • Violin Paint Flamed Back of Solid Maple Select Spruce Solid Top
  • Paint Sides & Neck & Head Ebony Fingerboard Ebony Pegs Metal tailpiece W/Plastic Tailpiece Adjuster Flame Finish
  • Includes Case , Bridge , Rosin , Bow , Cover cloth
  • Free Havana Shoulder Rest worth 800 INR
  • Sold By ChennaiMusicals


Havana MV1412F Violin with Ebony Pegs Features: Violin Paint Flamed Back of Solid Maple Select Spruce Solid Top Sizes: 3/4 Size & 4/4 Full Size Paint Sides & Neck & Head Ebony Fingerboard Ebony Pegs Metal tailpiece W/Plastic Tailpiece Adjuster Flame Finish With Bow & VLS-90 Lightweight Case

Features / Reviews

Violin Paint Flamed Back of Solid Maple Select Spruce Solid Top

Paint Sides & Neck & Head Ebony Fingerboard Ebony Pegs Metal tailpiece W/Plastic Tailpiece Adjuster Flame Finish

Includes Case , Bridge , Rosin , Bow , Cover cloth

7.

Stentor 1500 4/4 Violin
 
Stentor 1500 4/4 Violin
368 Reviews
  • Hand crafted with fine-grained solid spruce top
  • Solid maple back
  • Full ebony fittings


All Products Are Imported From The USA. All Electronic Products Must Be Used With A Step Down/Up Converter For Voltage Compatibility.

Features / Reviews

Hand crafted with fine-grained solid spruce top

Solid maple back with full ebony fittings

8.

Blueberry V-10 (Imported) Acoustic Violin (4/4, Maroon)
 
Blueberry V-10 (Imported) Acoustic Violin (4/4, Maroon)
9 Reviews
  • Craftsmanship: all details were hand-carved by senior luthier
  • Material: Maple top with maple back, sides and scroll. Hardwood fingerboard, pegs and chin rest, and an alloy tailpiece with four integrated fine tuners
  • Outfit Includes: lightweight hard case, a bow with unbleached genuine, an adjustable shoulder rest with soft foam padding, bridge, rosin
  • Disclaimer: Product images can be wary due to lighting effects in photography


Blueberry V-10 is completely hand crafted by senior luthiers with a solid maple top and maple back, sides and scroll. It is fitted with a hardwood fingerboard, pegs and chin rest, and an alloy tailpiece with four integrated fine tuners. This violin includes a lightweight form case, a bow , an adjustable shoulder rest with soft foam padding, bridge, this package ideal for beginners.

Features / Reviews

Light rosin for your violin, viola, or cello bow

Fitted with a hardwood fingerboard, pegs and chin rest, and an alloy tailpiece with four integrated fine tuners

9.

Infinity Colour Violin 4/4, Blue
 
  • Material: Maple Wood ; Colour: Blue
  • Glossy finish
  • Rose wood tail piece; Hubert bridge & also comes with Ebony Pegs & Fingerboard.
  • List Of Included Items: 1 Violin, 1 Bow, 1 Rosin & 1 Carry Case


Violin is completely hand-carved with a solid spruce top and maple back and sides. It is fitted with a maple fingerboard, pegs, and chin rest, and an alloy tailpiece with four integrated fine tuners. This violin includes a lightweight foam fitting hard, a wood bow with unbleached genuine horse hair & rosin. This model is ideal for intermediate level.

Features / Reviews

Glossy finish

Rose wood tail piece; Hubert bridge & also comes with Ebony Pegs & Fingerboard.

Included Items: 1 Violin, 1 Bow, 1 Rosin & 1 Carry Case

10.

Sharma Musical Store Maple Wood Violin with Case
 
  • Classic violin
  • Material: Maple wood
  • Good acoustic sound
  • Great finishing touch for any Party theme


Sharma Musical Store violin made with the super wood material for professionals. Once you will get this you won’t be able to stop playing.

Features / Reviews

Good acoustic sound

Great finishing touch

Made with the super wood material for professionals

Benefits of Violin

Here are some of the top benefits of playing Violin:

Violin lessons boost memory and mental capacities

Many studies show that playing the violin (alongside other musical instruments) even for just a year positively affects your brain’s capacity for memory. It can also improve your reading skills, language processing, speech and attention span. Research has found that children and teens who play the violin have stronger verbal and visual pattern abilities than those playing other instruments. Also, violinists have larger than average brains, with those parts connected to left-hand movements particularly responsive and sensitive. For children battling with psychological disorders, playing the violin even has a calming effect that helps prevent episodes. 

Learn to play the violin for finer motor skills, sensory and physical function

I bet you’ve never seen a violinist with poor posture. In fact, it’s impossible to play the violin properly without standing and sitting well. That’s because playing requires super strong upper arms, shoulder muscles and an actively engaged core. During a single lesson you’ll likely feel a workout in your deltoids, biceps and pectoral muscles – over time your stamina will increase and you’ll look physically toned in these areas. Holding the violin correctly also promotes fine motor skills, while doing simultaneous yet different complex manoeuvres with each hand boosts dexterity and precision. After long-term training, musicians have an enhanced ability to respond to touch, aural and visual stimuli. Which means, all things considered, violin practice is an excellent antidote for a sedentary existence spent hunching over laptops and tablets.

Pick up a bow for increased social benefits

Learning a musical instrument takes discipline – you need to set aside time each day to practice to see incremental improvements. It can build character, self-reliance, self-esteem and self-awareness – all of which help make for a well-rounded, well-adjusted human being. Performances and music competitions offer a chance to meet other like-minded players who are also actively seeking to improve their skills. Children and teenagers who join an orchestra particularly benefit from the sense of belonging. Plus the violin gives individuals a chance to shine out from the crowd and bask in the sense of accomplishment as there are more opportunities for solo performances than other orchestral instruments.

Release negative emotions and stress

Did you know playing the violin releases hormones that make you feel happier? Research shows it’s an excellent way to relieve stress, which means violinists can experience lower levels of depression and anxiety. Music can also help release difficult feelings in a constructive, benign way. Regardless of whether you’re young or old, it’s never too late to pick up a new skill or hobby – especially one that gives you so much in return.

Conclusion

When you read through our reviews, tips and info, you probably realized that even though violins might seem like they’re all the same, there are lots of little things that make them individuals. Make sure that you don’t just pick one, but take time to really think about what it is that you need from your violin.

You will also have time to let the instrument warm up. Violins are like people. If they sit around sedentary for a while, they can get stiff. A violin that has been hanging in a store or a warehouse shelf for a while needs to be played consistently in order to loosen up and release its real sound.

 

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